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Contact Information
Telephone: 502-893-3333
e-mail:sales@twoway.com

Davis Electronics Co. Inc.

Louisville's premiere two-way radio dealer

  • 1 Kenwood Radios

    Davis Electronics is your Kenwood Radio dealer in the Louisville, Southern Indiana area we can supply your airtime, Instillation and technical service needs as well as product and system Engineering and consulting needs !
    Read Me...
  • 2 Vertex Standard Dealer

    Davis Electronics is your Vertex Standard Radio dealer in the Louisville, Southern Indiana area we can supply your airtime, Instillation and technical service needs as well as product and system Engineering and consulting needs !
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  • 3 Commercial Tower Rental

    Davis Electronics offers seven strategically placed tower sites across Kentucky and Southern Indian available for commercial tower space rental. All sites incorporate electronics security,video surveillance, and environmentally controlled clean environment.
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  • 4 Wireless Data

    Unrivaled Wireless Solutions That Deliver Greater Agility There’s a reason why Davis Electronics Wireless Network Solutions are used The unrivalled Davis Electronics portfolio of Point-to-Point (PTP), Point-to-Multipoint (PMP), and Mesh Wide Area Network (MWAN), WLAN and VoWLAN solutions make governments, enterprises, and service providers more agile by helping them deploy voice, video, and data applications right where they need them.
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  • 5 I.P. Video surveillance

    Davis Electronics is an Exacqvision solutions partner. we our proud to offer the finest I.P. security systems that can be purchased. Exacqvision is second to none from a small 4 camera system to hundreds on one system
    Read Me...

Davis Electronics is now your RCA Prodigi Dealer

 
   
 
Davis Electronics is pleased to announce that we are now a RCA Prodigi dealer
Just another choice in getting the best value for your radio buck. 

GMRS and Itinerant frequencies are channels that people may use to carry  out communications from 

location to location as needed through-out the united states these channels are kind of like licensed CB

channels.  You may get a license by filling out the form attached to this link and sending to the FCC with a filing fee of $85.00.

 FCC form 605.pdf


GMRS and Itinerant Frequencies 

30.840

33.120

33.140

33.400

035.0200

035.0400

042.9800 Pink Dot

043.0400

151.5050

151.5125

151.6250 Red Dot

151.6400

151.7000

151.7600

151.8200 MURS1

151.8800 MURS2

151.9400 MURS3

151.9550 Purple Dot

154.5275

154.5700 MURS4/Blue Dot

154.6000 MURS5/Green Dot

158.4000

158.4075

451.8000

451.8125

456.8000

456.8125

457.5250

457.5375

457.5500

457.5625

457.5750

457.5875

457.6000

457.6125

462.5750 GMRS2/White Dot

462.6250 GMRS4/Black Dot

462.6750 GMRS6/Orange Dot

464.5000 Brown Dot

464.5500 Yellow Dot

467.7500

467.7625 "J" Dot

467.7750

467.7875

467.8000

467.8125 "K" Dot

467.8250

467.8375

467.8500 Silver Star

467.8625

467.8750 Gold Star

467.8875

467.9000 Red Star

467.9125

467.9250 BLue Star

469.5000

469.5500

897.6375

897.6625

900.9750

900.9875

936.6375

936.6625

939.9750

939.9875

 

 

Because their continued operation caused interference to an authorized spectrum user, the FCC denied their request for leniency and levied the full $20,000, citing that Emigrant operated in violation of the rules both “willfully” and “repeatedly.”

Your business too could receive a surprise visit from the FCC, and that visit may lead to fines of $11,000, $13,000 or, as in the case of Emigrant, even more. It’s easy to prevent both the visit and the fines if you know why this might happen and the steps you can take.

The FCC has responsibility for regulating two-way radios and other wireless devices. Recently, the agency has significantly ramped up its enforcement initiatives for interference, operations and licensing.  This means that some business owners are getting unexpected visits from FCC enforcement agents, leading to citations and hefty fines. In fact, FCC fines totaled $25,287,000 in FY 13.  And to help do enforcement jobs even better, the FCC recently requested more than $52 million, with a good portion of that for new radio direction-finding vehicles and electronic monitoring equipment.

While you share your radio’s operating frequencies with other users, you won’t know that someone is monitoring your frequencies until one of your co-channel neighbors has a problem with their system and reports it to the FCC, possibly leading to a visit from an enforcement agent. If the agent tells you that you are not operating on the authorized frequency as stipulated on your license and you respond that your radio dealer programmed your company’s radios, you will soon learn that responsibility rests with the licensee name – yours.

This action could lead to a Notice of Violation (NOV) and a fine that could cost your business $7,000 for the interference and $4,000 for the use of an unauthorized frequency, an $11,000 fine for something you may not have even known you were doing wrong. Your dealer, because of the programming error, would likely receive a Citation for Illegal Programming of Unauthorized Frequencies that could cost $16,000 a day and even seizure of equipment. The possible fines don’t end there. Your company is responsible for responding to the FCC within 20 days. A delay in responding could cost another $4,000. The fines add up!

License expiration may bring the FCC Enforcement agent to your door. This happens frequently when the person with license responsibility leaves your organization and expiration notices are ignored. As with the Emigrant example, that can be an expensive mistake.

You can file a Special Temporary Authorization (STA) to continue operating, or you may simply stop using your radios. Continue operating without the STA and the FCC can issue a NOV for operating without a license, which means a $10,000 fine for operating without a valid license and $3,000 for failure to file the required renewal forms.

You may be feeling confident that your business is operating in compliance with the narrowband mandate, which became effective January 2013, but  are you sure your actual license is in compliance as well? The FCC will not renew a license if there is still a wideband emission showing on the license – even if there is appropriate narrowband operation taking place. The NOV fine for this particular piece of overlooked paperwork is $4,000. Unless you don’t respond in a timely fashion to the NOV, in which case, you can incur another $4,000 fine for tardiness.

A visit from an FCC Enforcement Bureau agent is easy to avoid.  Your business is the responsible party for your license. Be proactive about possible interference, operations and license issues by contacting your two-way radio dealer to make sure you are completely in compliance. Or contact EWA for a Detailed License Analysis that checks everything from your authorized frequencies to the correct contact and mailing address. These are simple steps that can help you avoid a costly notice or visit from the FCC.

Because their continued operation caused interference to an authorized spectrum user, the FCC denied their request for leniency and levied the full $20,000, citing that Emigrant operated in violation of the rules both “willfully” and “repeatedly.”

Your business too could receive a surprise visit from the FCC, and that visit may lead to fines of $11,000, $13,000 or, as in the case of Emigrant, even more. It’s easy to prevent both the visit and the fines if you know why this might happen and the steps you can take.

The FCC has responsibility for regulating two-way radios and other wireless devices. Recently, the agency has significantly ramped up its enforcement initiatives for interference, operations and licensing.  This means that some business owners are getting unexpected visits from FCC enforcement agents, leading to citations and hefty fines. In fact, FCC fines totaled $25,287,000 in FY 13.  And to help do enforcement jobs even better, the FCC recently requested more than $52 million, with a good portion of that for new radio direction-finding vehicles and electronic monitoring equipment.

While you share your radio’s operating frequencies with other users, you won’t know that someone is monitoring your frequencies until one of your co-channel neighbors has a problem with their system and reports it to the FCC, possibly leading to a visit from an enforcement agent. If the agent tells you that you are not operating on the authorized frequency as stipulated on your license and you respond that your radio dealer programmed your company’s radios, you will soon learn that responsibility rests with the licensee name – yours.

This action could lead to a Notice of Violation (NOV) and a fine that could cost your business $7,000 for the interference and $4,000 for the use of an unauthorized frequency, an $11,000 fine for something you may not have even known you were doing wrong. Your dealer, because of the programming error, would likely receive a Citation for Illegal Programming of Unauthorized Frequencies that could cost $16,000 a day and even seizure of equipment. The possible fines don’t end there. Your company is responsible for responding to the FCC within 20 days. A delay in responding could cost another $4,000. The fines add up!

License expiration may bring the FCC Enforcement agent to your door. This happens frequently when the person with license responsibility leaves your organization and expiration notices are ignored. As with the Emigrant example, that can be an expensive mistake.

You can file a Special Temporary Authorization (STA) to continue operating, or you may simply stop using your radios. Continue operating without the STA and the FCC can issue a NOV for operating without a license, which means a $10,000 fine for operating without a valid license and $3,000 for failure to file the required renewal forms.

You may be feeling confident that your business is operating in compliance with the narrowband mandate, which became effective January 2013, but  are you sure your actual license is in compliance as well? The FCC will not renew a license if there is still a wideband emission showing on the license – even if there is appropriate narrowband operation taking place. The NOV fine for this particular piece of overlooked paperwork is $4,000. Unless you don’t respond in a timely fashion to the NOV, in which case, you can incur another $4,000 fine for tardiness.

A visit from an FCC Enforcement Bureau agent is easy to avoid.  Your business is the responsible party for your license. Be proactive about possible interference, operations and license issues by contacting your two-way radio dealer to make sure you are completely in compliance. Or contact EWA for a Detailed License Analysis that checks everything from your authorized frequencies to the correct contact and mailing address. These are simple steps that can help you avoid a costly notice or visit from the FCC.

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COPYRIGT Davis Electronics Co. Inc. 2013